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Version complète : Topettes at home ?
Forum du Musée Virtuel de l'Absinthe > LA COLLECTION D'ANTIQUITÉS SUR L'ABSINTHE > Discussions sur la collection d'antiquités
rob fritz
I have been thinking about the use of topettes at home during the famous Bistro days long ago.
Many of us, including myself think that you were able to bring a topette to a bistro and buy whatever amount of "doses" you wanted and take it home.
But now I have my doubts, after spending many years in and around bars I think this would not make sense here is why.
Bistros and Bars are in business to make money, lots of it and generally the first 3 or 4 doses (shots) is used to pay for the bottle, well at least today it is, so why would anyone bring a
topette to a bristro only to have spent the same amount of money on a full bottle and take home only a small amount ?

I think the best way to prove this out either way would be to look at a wine shop's price list, retail not invoice and a menu price per dose and see where the economics take us.

The only thing that would make sense is that you brought a topette with you to the Bistro have a great time and at the end of the night before it closed you had the bartender fill it up so you could take the party home at the end of the night, not just fill a topette and take it home

Your thoughts ?
Marc
I think you're referring to my last newsletter where I said "We believe that topettes were also used at home. Instead of buying a full bottle, absintheurs could buy 5, 8 or 10 doses of absinthe at the bistro just round the corner."
Problem is that I used the word "bistro" to simplify things and because I couldn't find the right English word for "débit de boissons" which was a place where people could buy alcohol and even food sometimes, a sort of liquor shop or grocery. It could also be a bistro but not always.

Here is a postcard showing a bistro at left and a Débit de Boissons at right:

Luthier
I took a topette to my local spirits store and asked for 5 doses of absinthe. They called the police. fool.gif
libellule70
LOL lol.gif
Thegreenimp
That sounds logical.

Perhaps people also kept Topettes at home, to use as a small decanter that one could easily pour a measured dose of absinthe, without having to use a shot glass, or measuring glass to prepare their absinthe. (Or other drink for that matter)

We have seen examples of professional bar-ware catalogs, what was generally available, or advertised specifically for the home?
Luthier
Now you have me wondering about the giant topette I have...
It has ten 75 ml doses, and is 13 inches tall. Is it possible that was used to hold so much, in
order to decant multiple doses at once into smaller topettes or several glasses at once?
It would almost serve as a bottle in this case.

I've wondered about this, and the only other possibility is that it was used for measuring other drinks that were not watered down, where a 75 ml measure would be appropriate

Thoughts?
Marc
Your giant topette is here: http://www.museeabsinthe.com/forums/index.php?showtopic=2440
Number 289.
Luthier
Cool, thanks Marc. I measured and the doses range from 60-65 ml, not 75.
rob fritz
"débit de boissons" A tavern with food and drink to go, there seems to be a few catagories in the modern time but this would fit perfectly into bringing a topette to be filled and take something home to eat. A local absinthe perhaps, something not too expensive I would think.
xcj
Hmmm I can't see the use case, a large topette is useful with a large group of people in a bistro, but it's not useful at home at all...
For one, I know how much water I like in my own glasses, so I don't have to meassure it precisely.

If I only can afford 4 doses the owner can just measure out the dose in the shop/bistro so I can bring it home in a bottle.

l'Assiette au Beurre 1906:
Allez chez Pannier chercher dix sous de rhum... et du meilleur!



Six sous d'absinthe et un sou de pain. Casse pas la bouteille!...
Artemis
I've said this before, but not here. It's my opinion that topettes were labor-saving devices (albeit sometimes also decorative) in bars and restaurants. When serving a group of people drinking the same beverage, or even when serving a single person, when he expressed his intent in advance to drink more than one, the waiter could make one trip instead of multiple trips to that table, thereby avoiding tying himself up with that one table any more than necessary. This is a big advantage in a busy place. There wouldn't be any need for one at home. As to modern equivalents for the Débit de Boissons, some Brewpubs in the U.S. will fill jars or jugs of beer for patrons who bring in their own containers to be filled. I have had this done myself, although the containers (Mason jars or jugs) had originally been sold to me filled with with beer by the brewpub itself.
Martin
Citation (Marc @ Mar 8 2013, 04:09 PM) *
I think you're referring to my last newsletter where I said "We believe that topettes were also used at home. Instead of buying a full bottle, absintheurs could buy 5, 8 or 10 doses of absinthe at the bistro just round the corner."
Problem is that I used the word "bistro" to simplify things and because I couldn't find the right English word for "débit de boissons" which was a place where people could buy alcohol and even food sometimes, a sort of liquor shop or grocery. It could also be a bistro but not always.

Here is a postcard showing a bistro at left and a Débit de Boissons at right:


Here in Germany there is something simular called the "Trinkhalle" these are usually small little shops which sell beer and other spirits, and all kinds of snacks and stuff
to take away. But they are becoming rare as most buy their last minute booze at the gas station. People also do not like to have a Trinkhalle near by where they live, as
they tend to be a hang out for heavy boozers and other kinds of people, normal people would make a big detour around.

As to the toppets they remind me of some restaurants where you can order either a 1/2 l or a ,75 l of wine in a decanter.
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